Corneal Sensitivity

& Related Pathologies
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Corneal Esthesiometer Brill

The Corneal Esthesiometer Brill is an electronical device for corneal sensitivity assesment through controlled air pulses as stimuli. It is the first non-invasive and portable corenal esthesiometer.

Portable and Hand-held
Non-Invasive system
Five levels of stimulation
Electronic position system
Designed to be used in 2 modes: placed on a slit lamp and hand-held
Incudes battery and charging dock

Corneal EsthesiometerKey Features

Non-invasive

It works with ambient air that exerts a specific pressure (stimulus) on the ocular surface.

Portable

Portable and handheld, the device has been designed to be used with one hand or mounted on a standard slit lamp.

Non-contact

There is no contact between the esthesiometer and the patient’s cornea. It can be used in patients with infectious corneal pathologies.

EPS

This consists of a camera and two IR LEDs. To ensure that the assessment is performed at the correct distance, the corneal esthesiometer has an electronic positioning system.

No calibration or maintenance is needed.

The esthesiometer comes with a charging dock for its battery. There is no need to buy replacement batteries.
First portable

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Non-invasive, accurate and precise.

CornealSensitivity

Corneal Sensitivity

The corneal epithelium has the highest density of free nerve endings of any tissue in the body1. It is primarily innervated by the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve pair (cranial nerve V)2. These nerves ensure the detection of any potential damaging substance present on the ocular surface, and stimulate tear production and lid closure as a protective mechanism via feedback loops between the ocular surface, the lacrimal glands, and the brain. They also provide trophic support to the tissues of the cornea and facilitate their repair and replacement1.
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(a)Distribution of corneal epithelial nerves; (b) Detail of the path of nerve endings from the periphery to the center of the corneal epithelium.3

Disruption of these nerves with interruption of the neural feedback loops between the ocular surface and the lacrimal glands can lead to corneal diseases such as dry eye disease (DED) and neurotrophic keratopathy (NK)2.

Corneal Sensitivity

The corneal epithelium has the highest density of free nerve endings of any tissue in the body1. It is primarily innervated by the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve pair (cranial nerve V)2. These nerves ensure the detection of any potential damaging substance present on the ocular surface, and stimulate tear production and lid closure as a protective mechanism via feedback loops between the ocular surface, the lacrimal glands, and the brain. They also provide trophic support to the tissues of the cornea and facilitate their repair and replacement1.

(a)Distribution of corneal epithelial nerves; (b) Detail of the path of nerve endings from the periphery to the center of the corneal epithelium.3

Disruption of these nerves with interruption of the neural feedback loops between the ocular surface and the lacrimal glands can lead to corneal diseases such as dry eye disease (DED) and neurotrophic keratopathy (NK)2.

Conversely, hypersensitivity of the nerve fibers and/or dysregulation of pain-controlling nerve centers can lead to neuropathic pain2.

Corneal Sensitivity

The corneal epithelium has the highest density of free nerve endings of any tissue in the body1. It is primarily innervated by the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve pair (cranial nerve V)2.
Eye surgery
Diabetic Keratopathy
Herpes Simplex Keratitis
Dry Eye Disease
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Mia McBride
Estato

Corneal EsthesiometerIndications

The Corneal Esthesiometer Brill assesses the corneal sensitivity of the human eye. It is a decisive tool for detecting subclinical corneal dysesthesia and related pathologies, such as diabetic keratopathy or lesions in the fifth cranial nerve. Early diagnosis and early effective treatment of these pathologies can prevent the patient from losing their vision and quality of life.

By using the corneal esthesiometer, ophthalmologists can prescribe specific treatment at an early stage and can even evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment by assessing the patient’s corneal sensitivity.

The detection of corneal dysesthesia may indicate to optometrists that the patient needs to be referred to an ophthalmologist, making the Corneal Esthesiometer a functional instrument that can guide them in this matter.

Furthermore, the esthesiometer may be very helpful to optometrists during the contact lens adaptation process and for monitoring the loss of corneal sensitivity associated with overnight orthokeratology, as shown by recent studies 13, 14.

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Corneal EsthesiometerIndications

The Corneal Esthesiometer Brill assesses the corneal sensitivity of the human eye. It is a decisive tool for detecting subclinical corneal dysesthesia and related pathologies, such as diabetic keratopathy or lesions in the fifth cranial nerve. Early diagnosis and early effective treatment of these pathologies can prevent the patient from losing their vision and quality of life.

By using the corneal esthesiometer, ophthalmologists can prescribe specific treatment at an early stage and can even evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment by assessing the patient’s corneal sensitivity.

The detection of corneal dysesthesia may indicate to optometrists that the patient needs to be referred to an ophthalmologist, making the Corneal Esthesiometer a functional instrument that can guide them in this matter.

Furthermore, the esthesiometer may be very helpful to optometrists during the contact lens adaptation process and for monitoring the loss of corneal sensitivity associated with overnight orthokeratology, as shown by recent studies 13, 14.

https://brill-international.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/esthesiometer_home_brillengines_2-1280x1280.jpg
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Precise

Dramatically visualize customer directed convergence without revolutionary ROI.
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Non-Invasive

Nanotechnology immersion will close the loop on focusing solely on the bottom line.
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Automated

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Corneal sensitivity may be altered in the following conditions:

01Eye surgery

LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis)3, LASEK (laser-assisted sub-epithelial keratomileusis)4 and corneal cross-linking5, among others. It has been suggested that the loss of corneal innervation resulting from these surgeries causes DED, loss of corneal sensitivity, and pain symptoms.

02Diabetic Keratopathy

Diabetic Keratopathy is characterized by abnormal innervation of the cornea, which results in decreased sensitivity and impaired epithelial wound healing6.

03Herpes Simplex Keratitis

Herpes Simplex Keratitis has been associated with more significant nerve damage. In the acute phase of this disease, loss of corneal sensation correlates strongly with a significant reduction in sub-basal nerve density7.

04Dry Eye Disease

DED begins with increasing nerve density and increased sensitivity (hyperesthesia) in the early stages, followed by a reduction in nerve density and hypoesthesia as the disease progresses8.

05Neurotrophic Keratopathy (NK)

Neurotrophic Keratopathy (NK) is a degenerative disease of the cornea caused by damage to the trigeminal nerve that causes loss of corneal sensitivity, the development of spontaneous lesions in the corneal epithelium, and the degradation of the healing capacity, which can lead to the development of ulcers, necrosis, and corneal perforation9.

06Keratoconus

Reduced corneal sensitivity in keratoconus is associated with age, disease duration, severity, lower central nerve fiber density, and the use of contact lenses10.

07Contact lens

Contact lens use is associated with reduced corneal sensitivity, although non-structural functional nerve changes related to this loss of corneal sensitivity have been demonstrated11.

08Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD)

Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) has been linked to low sensitivity and nerve density, caused by corneal nerve changes in conditions associated with chronic corneal edema12.